Yolo County District Attorney Jeff Reisig

Yolo County DA Reisig 2015District Attorney Jeff Reisig has served as Yolo County’s chief law enforcement official since 2007.  As the elected department head, Reisig oversees a total staff of 90, including over 30 deputy district attorneys, 12 sworn peace officers, 5 victim advocates and a diverse array of professional support staff.

Prior to becoming District Attorney, Reisig specialized in handling the most violent criminal cases, including: murder, mayhem, aggravated assault, robbery, and gang crimes. His colleagues voted him Yolo County Prosecutor of the Year for three consecutive years from 2003 - 2005.

Throughout his tenure as the District Attorney, Reisig has focused on making victims’ rights a top priority. A guiding value for the District Attorney’s Office under Reisig has been ensuring that victims are treated fairly by the entire criminal justice system and that their rights are given just as much consideration as the accused.  Crime victims’ organizations around California have consistently recognized the Yolo County District Attorney’s Office as a leader in victims’ rights.

Innovation has been another distinguishing hallmark of Reisig’s leadership as District Attorney. The Yolo County District Attorney's Office was the first prosecutor’s office in California to launch and utilize a paperless criminal case management system in court. Increased efficiency, faster responses to victims, taxpayer savings and an overall improved administration of justice were the result of the groundbreaking project. In addition, the District Attorney’s Office is now the county-wide hub for all high-tech investigations. The High-Tech Division also coordinates “Operation Vigilance,” which is an ongoing effort to utilize cutting edge technology to monitor convicted sex offenders across Yolo County.

Finally, District Attorney Reisig has been committed to effective community outreach and engagement through progressive programs such as Citizens Academy, Multi-Cultural Community Council and Neighborhood Court.

Reisig earned his undergraduate degree in Managerial Economics at the University of California at Davis and his law degree at the University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law, where he graduated with Great Distinction and Order of the Coif.

Vision, Mission, Values, Strategic Priorities

Vision Statement

Seek Justice.  Do Justice.

Mission Statement

We pursue truth and justice for victims and our communities with commitment, courage and integrity.

Goals, Beliefs and Values

Truth - We always seek the truth.

Integrity - We uphold public trust with unwavering integrity.

Accountability - We believe in personal responsibility and accountability.

Justice - We are committed to fair and equitable justice for all.

Collaboration - We work cohesively with our law enforcement partners, our communities and each other to achieve justice.

Innovation - We have the courage to pursue innovation in everything we do.

Communication - We value open communication and an informed citizenry.

Respect - We acknowledge and respect the diverse views and contributions of all in the criminal justice system and in our communities.

Leadership Development

The District Attorney is committed to Leadership Development for his staff and Yolo County as a whole. In furtherance of this goal, we will post relevant leadership articles and links on this site to share internally and beyond.

Five Irrefutable Paradoxes Of Leadership

The paradox of leadership is that sometimes actual leaders have to embrace qualities that don’t come naturally to them.  In this article, we will explore the five paradoxes of leadership and look at how they can make you a more effective leader.

By Andreas Jones

http://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2016/10/24/five-irrefutable-paradoxes-of-leadership/#ed7665c24938


Want to Succeed?  First, Become Self-Aware

By Daniel Goleman

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/want-succeed-first-become-self-aware-daniel-goleman


Practices for Effective Local Government Leadership

https://icma.org/practices-effective-local-government-leadership


How Great Leaders Ask Great Questions

By Ron Ashkenas

http://www.forbes.com/sites#/sites/ronashkenas/2015/06/19/how-great-leaders-ask-great-questions/#1acf8c235f5b

How well do you ask questions? Great leaders know how to ask great questions of themselves and others. This is a skill that can be learned. The attached article link provides a good discussion of the issue and the video is just fun.


7 Habits Of Natural Leaders

By Carolyn Gregoire

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/10/20/traits-that-make-a-leader_n_5959298.html


 Why Good Leaders Make You Feel Safe

By Simon Sinek

An intriguing analysis of how great leaders build a culture of trust in successful organizations.


 Why Most Leaders Need to Shut Up and Listen

By Mike Myatt

http://www.forbes.com/sites/mikemyatt/2012/02/09/why-most-leaders-need-to-shut-up-listen/


Social Intelligence and Leadership

This video can be viewed in High Definition on the Harvard Business Review

Daniel Goleman, psychologist, encourages you to see how you can use emotional and social intelligence to improve your own and your organization's performance.


Leading with Emotional Intelligence

By David Cory, M.A.

EITC Article Science of People Skills | EITC Article Leaders with EI | EITC Leading with EI (2010)


What Makes a Leader?

By Daniel Goleman

https://hbr.org/2004/01/what-makes-a-leader


Disclaimer: Any links to external websites and/or non-Yolo County District Attorney information provided on Yolo County District Attorney pages are provided as a courtesy. They should not be construed as an endorsement by the Yolo County District Attorney of the content or views of the linked materials.

Criminal Cases & Jury Trial Statistics

The statistics displayed were extracted from the Yolo County District Attorney’s Office’s Case Management System and analyzed by the Yolo County District Attorney’s Office. The 2017 statistics involving the Public Defender’s Office were determined in collaboration with the Yolo County Public Defender’s Office. Some of these cases were initiated and/or filed by the District Attorney’s Office in a previous year. For example, a defendant may be arrested in 2016, but that defendant may not have his or her first court appearance until 2017. In this scenario, the case would be a new case for the District Attorney's Office in 2016 and a new case for the Public Defender's Office in 2017. Because of this, the case in this scenario would not be reflected in the 2017 Criminal Cases statistics for Felony and Misdemeanor cases (since it was a 2016 DA case).

Some cases involve multiple defendants. In such cases, more than one defense counsel is needed. For example, the Public Defender’s Office cannot, except in rare circumstances, represent more than one defendant/client in a single criminal case. Such scenarios create a “conflict” that requires appointment of counsel from the Conflicts Panel or the defendant retaining a private attorney. Because of this, the number of defense counsel exceeds the number of cases filed by the District Attorney’s Office and the total percentages in the case bar graphs exceed 100%. For example, a case involving 5 defendants could have defense counsel from the Public Defender's Office, Conflict Panel, and Private Attorneys. Each of these defense counsel would be reflected in the 2017 Defense Counsel % statistics. The bar graphs show the percentage of cases where the defense counsel was involved; however, the pie charts are a percentage based off the total defendants.

In 2017, there was 1 Misdemeanor Jury Trial that was prosecuted by the Attorney General’s Office.

Public Defender: Represented by an attorney from the Yolo County Public Defender’s Office.
Conflict: Represented by an attorney from the Conflict Panel.
Private: Represented by a Private Attorney.
Pro Per: The defendant represents himself/herself.
Unrepresented: No formal defense counsel was appointed, or the defendant has not appeared in court.

These statistics were updated on April 20, 2018. As cases are updated, these statistics can change.


2017 Felony & Misdemeanor Statistics
Based on Criminal Case Count (Total Percentages Above 100% - Full Explanation Above)

Felonies: 1,171 | Misdemeanors: 6,606 | Total: 7,777


Public Defender: 912 (77.88%) | Conflict Panel: 181 (15.46%) | Private Attorney: 190 (16.23%) | Pro Per: 4 (0.34%)


Public Defender: 1,855 (28.08%) | Conflict Panel: 79 (1.20%) | Private Attorney: 431 (6.52%) | Pro Per: 2 (0.03%)


Public Defender: 2,767 (35.58%) | Conflict Panel: 260 (3.34%) | Private Attorney: 621 (7.99%) | Pro Per: 6 (0.08%)


Felonies: 54 | Misdemeanors*: 30 | Total: 84


Public Defender: 45 (83.33%) | Conflict Panel: 8 (14.81%) | Private Attorney: 10 (18.52%)


Public Defender: 26 (86.67%) | Conflict Panel: 0 (0.00%) | Private Attorney: 4 (13.33%)


Public Defender: 71 (84.52%) | Conflict Panel: 8 (9.52%) | Private Attorney: 14 (16.67%)
*There was 1 Misdemeanor Case prosecuted by the Attorney General’s Office.


Based on Criminal Defendant Count

Felonies: 1,322 | Misdemeanors: 6,792 | Total: 8,114


Public Defender: 912 (68.99%) | Conflict Panel: 181 (13.69%) | Private Attorney: 190 (14.37%) | Pro Per: 4 (0.30%)


Public Defender: 1,855 (27.31%) | Conflict Panel: 79 (1.16%) | Private Attorney: 431 (6.35%) | Pro Per: 2 (0.03%)


Public Defender: 2,767 (34.10%) | Conflict Panel: 260 (3.20%) | Private Attorney: 621 (7.65%) | Pro Per: 6 (0.07%)


Felonies: 63 | Misdemeanors: 30 | Total: 93


Public Defender: 45 (71.43%) | Conflict Panel: 8 (12.70%) | Private Attorney: 10 (15.87%)


Public Defender: 26 (86.67%) | Conflict Panel: 0 (0.00%) | Private Attorney: 4 (13.33%)


Public Defender: 71 (76.34%) | Conflict Panel: 8 (8.60%) | Private Attorney: 14 (15.05%)


2016 Felony & Misdemeanor Statistics
Based on Criminal Case Count (Total Percentages Above 100% - Full Explanation Above)

Felonies: 1,128 | Misdemeanors: 6,280 | Total: 7,408


Public Defender: 869 (77.04%) | Conflict Panel: 202 (17.91%) | Private Attorney: 175 (15.51%) | Pro Per: 6 (0.53%)


Public Defender: 1,770 (28.18%) | Conflict Panel: 126 (2.01%) | Private Attorney: 416 (6.62%) | Pro Per: 6 (0.10%)


Public Defender: 2,639 (35.62%) | Conflict Panel: 328 (4.43%) | Private Attorney: 591 (7.98%) | Pro Per: 12 (0.16%)


Felonies: 54 | Misdemeanors: 47 | Total: 101


Public Defender: 43 (79.63%) | Conflict Panel: 6 (11.11%) | Private Attorney: 10 (18.52%) | Pro Per: 0 (0.00%)


Public Defender: 38 (80.85%) | Conflict Panel: 3 (6.38%) | Private Attorney: 6 (12.77%) | Pro Per: 1 (2.13%)


Public Defender: 81 (80.20%) | Conflict Panel: 9 (8.91%) | Private Attorney: 16 (15.84%) | Pro Per: 1 (0.99%)


Based on Criminal Defendant Count

Felonies: 1,328 | Misdemeanors: 6,468 | Total: 7,796


Public Defender: 869 (65.44%) | Conflict Panel: 202 (15.21%) | Private Attorney: 175 (13.18%) | Pro Per: 6 (0.45%)


Public Defender: 1,770 (27.37%) | Conflict Panel: 126 (1.95%) | Private Attorney: 416 (6.43%) | Pro Per: 6 (0.09%)


Public Defender: 2,639 (33.85%) | Conflict Panel: 328 (4.21%) | Private Attorney: 591 (7.58%) | Pro Per: 12 (0.15%)


Felonies: 59 | Misdemeanors: 48 | Total: 107


Public Defender: 43 (72.88%) | Conflict Panel: 6 (10.17%) | Private Attorney: 10 (16.95%) | Pro Per: 0 (0.00%)


Public Defender: 38 (79.17%) | Conflict Panel: 3 (6.25%) | Private Attorney: 6 (12.50%) | Pro Per: 1 (2.08%)


Public Defender: 81 (75.70%) | Conflict Panel: 9 (8.41%) | Private Attorney: 16 (14.95%) | Pro Per: 1 (0.93%)


All inquiries regarding these statistics can be sent to district.attorney@yolocounty.org.

Honoring Yolo County Fallen Peace Officers

City Marshal William Rice

 

Patrolman Ivan Casselman

 

Deputy Sheriff Walter Leinberger

 

Motor Officer Lawrence Sills

 

Patrilman Douglas Eugene Cantrill

 

Patrol Officer William Freeman

 

Patrol Officer Roy Blecher

 

Police Officer James McKnight

 

Patrol Sergeant Gary Wagers

 

Patrolman Andrew Stevens

 

Deputy Sheriff Jose Antonio Diaz

 

Photos provided by the Yolo County Retired Peace Officers Association